“When purchasing a CBD product, keep in mind that a transparent company’s CBD milligram (mg) strength is reflective of the actual active CBD in that particular product,” states Farias. “If a bottle says 250 mg of CBD, then that product should contain 250 mg of actual active CBD. However, a lot of companies currently in the market will list the mg dosage of their CBD hemp oil without publishing the strength of their actual active CBD.”
Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of dozens of non-psychoactive cannabinoids found in the hemp plant. Cannabidiol, and all the other cannabinoids, were patented by the United States Government in 2003 as neuroprotectants and antioxidants (Patent No. 6,630,507). Cannabinoids are characterized by their ability to act on the cannabinoid receptors that are found throughout the body. CBD and other cannabinoids are naturally occurring compounds that display potent anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties. They can promote the body’s healthy regulation of the central nervous, immune, and endocannabinoid systems.
It’s a truism to state that pain is an inevitable part of life. And it’s true that we all, from time to time, experience pain that is short-lived and treatable. But those who deal with chronic pain know the debilitating, life-sucking reality of this condition. And traditional medications often come with long lists of side effects which can be as debilitating as the pain itself.
Although it is legal to manufacture products containing cannabidiol (CBD) from naturally low-THC hemp here in the U.S., it is still largely illegal to grow hemp in America, with small exceptions being made for pilot programs through the 2014 Farm Bill. Therefore, we must import all the hemp oil used in the formulation of our products from international sources.
There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:

There is a growing number of medical cannabis dispensaries offering CBD-rich products in the U.S. Most physical dispensaries are required to operate under state health and safety standards set by law. The state conducts background checks on owner and staff, and dispensaries must meet security requirements and strict licensing guidelines. When buying hemp-based CBD oil (low in THC or/and CBD) you will not need a card, however, to purchase cannabis plant-based CBD oil patients need to be certified by a doctor who is part of their continuing care, and who’s registered with the state’s medical-marijuana program. That, however, applies only to those living in states that have passed medical marijuana laws. It is important for one to visit the dispensaries and get as much information as to whether their products have been tested and undergone clinical trials.
For example, using CBD vape oil requires a vaporizer, something you may be unfamiliar with, and for a beginner it can be intimidating. But vaping is only one option, and if you’re new to the world of CBD, a tincture is your best bet—it’s portable, discreet, and easy to use. And with only a few drops or sprays on your tongue, it’s super easy to keep track of your daily serving size.
Cannabidiol (CBD) oil has become increasingly popular as a natural way to help people try to manage pain, reduce inflammation, and cope with anxiety.* Though the number of prescriptions has risen sharply in the United States over the past 20 years, many Americans are trying to limit the number of prescribed drugs they take – instead, searching for all-natural solutions to the aches, pains, and discomfort they begin to face as they age. For many of them, CBD oil is the solution they’ve been looking for. But not all CBD oil is created equal, meaning finding the right CBD oil could just be the most important part of their journey.
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