In order to account for the low CBD content of these hemp plants, manufacturers have to process large volumes of raw material at a time, with the idea of extracting just enough CBD so that they can label their product as a “CBD oil.” While this method is fine in theory, what ultimately ends up happening (unless the manufacturer’s extraction methods are state of the art), is that traces of chemicals cane end up being left over in the final product. These chemicals can potentially contain harsh solvents such as butane, hexane, and propylene glycol, which has been known to break down into carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.
There is a lot to be hopeful for as legalization marches forward and as cannabis becomes more widely accepted for its medicinal purposes. Unfortunately, with cannabis and CBD still listed as schedule one substances, research is limited and many medical professionals still remain in fear to discuss or endorse medical cannabis for something like cancer. As of March 2015, over 15,000 patients in the state of Colorado reported severe nausea or cancer as their reporting condition for their medical card. Organizations like Project CBD, Realm of Caring, and CannaKids provide resources and connect families who seek cannabinoid therapy for their illnesses. According to a 2016 estimate by procon.org, there are over 2.5 million medical marijuana users in the United States. This number grows every year as more states legalize access to medical cannabis and it’s becoming harder for the mainstream medical community to ignore this growing group of people.

However, since the 1950s it has been lumped into the same category of marijuana, and thus the extremely versatile crop was doomed in the United States. Industrial hemp is technically from the same species of plant that psychoactive marijuana comes from. However, it is from a different variety, or subspecies that contains many important differences. The main differences between industrial hemp and marijuana will be discussed below.
Endoca focuses on producing both decarboxylated and raw CBD oils. There are up to 400 molecules found in Endoca CBD Hemp Oil, including alkanes, cannabis plant waxes, amino acids, nitrogenous compounds, ketones, aldehydes, glycosides, flavonoids, pigments, and vitamins, among the others. There are also vitamin Eand omega 3s and 6s in Endoca CBD Hemp Oil.

Available in 3 labels (Green, Blue, and Gold), our RSHO™ provides a high-CBD hemp oil supplement with minimal processing. Because of its high concentration of CBD, RSHO™ is our most expensive line of products. In the 3 gram tubes, our Green Label contains 300 mg of CBD for $69, the Blue Label has 510 mg for $149, and our refined Gold Label tops out at 720 mg for $179.
For those customers looking to balance cost and potency, three of our popular brands, RSHO™, Dixie Botanicals®, and Cibdex®, carry a line of CBD hemp oil capsules with a moderate 25 mg of CBD per capsule. These medium potency capsules contain the same CBD hemp oil as our other products, making it simple to take your CBD supplements with you. These bottles fit easily into an overnight bag or briefcase and are never out of place in a bathroom medicine cabinet or office drawer, ensuring your CBD hemp oil supplements are within reach.
Both the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society recognize the potential of CBD oil in suppressing and fighting the spread of life-threatening cancer cells. Although they claim that CBD can’t be a cure, a growing number of studies suggest that cannabidiol can help to suppress the development and progression of various cancers, such as lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers.

“When purchasing a CBD product, keep in mind that a transparent company’s CBD milligram (mg) strength is reflective of the actual active CBD in that particular product,” states Farias. “If a bottle says 250 mg of CBD, then that product should contain 250 mg of actual active CBD. However, a lot of companies currently in the market will list the mg dosage of their CBD hemp oil without publishing the strength of their actual active CBD.”

RSHO™, Dixie Botanicals®, and Cibdex® all feature tinctures in their brand. Both RSHO™ and Dixie Botanicals® tinctures come in 1 oz bottles that contain 100 mg of CBD for $29. Our shop also offers 2 oz bottles with 500 mg of CBD that range in price from $90 for the RSHO™ to $129 for Dixie Botanicals®. Cibdex® tinctures are slightly more at $39 for 100 mg and $149 for 500 mg.

Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is one of the cannabinoids present in both marijuana and agricultural hemp, and it is the substance responsible for giving a psychoactive effect on the body. It is what gives a user a “high.” The reason why hemp is used over marijuana when creating CBD oil is because of the former’s innate low levels of THC over CBD, making it perfect for CBD oil processing.
There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:
The most common uses of ginger root are: a remedy for motion sickness and nausea, as a digestive aid, heartburn, gas, and bloating, a powerful anti-inflammatory, lowers cholesterol and blood pressure, a warming remedy for colds, flus, and sore throats, for ultimate immune boosting properties, and aids in suppressing cancer cells as seen from recent research.
Do you think CBD oil may be right for you? Then check out Green Roads CBD oils for the highest-quality CBD tinctures on the market! We offer CBD hemp oil tinctures in a different range of dosages, from 100mg to 3500mg per bottle, to meet your specific needs. Designed to fit into your daily routine and easy to buy online, Green Roads CBD oils were made with our customers in mind.

Ultimately, the quality of any CBD oil comes down to the extraction process that’s used, and how well the concentrate is produced and finalized. Here’s the thing, though: like we mentioned earlier, products from the Cannabis ruderalis plant (aka hemp) are assumed to be legal by some as long as they are imported into the U.S. from other countries. The only problem with this, of course, is that raw material from low THC- Plants, such as C. ruderalis is typically low in active cannabinoids, including CBD.


As a representative with 2 companies that have CBD on the market and as a person with intractable pain and multple painful problems wirth my spine I can say that cbd does not work for everyone. It does nothing for me or for my mil who has a cancer like growth impeding her ability to swallow and has undergone radiation to shrink it. Everyone has a chemistry that’s personal to them for some it helps but for many it does not. With that in mind it’s a 50/50 chance of it helping and until you come out your pocket you’ll never know. Buyer beware.
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