CBD and cannabis have been studied in other specific cancers. A 2013 study published in the journal Chemotherapy studied the effects of synthetic THC against gastric cancer grafts in rodents. Rodents treated with the THC saw a 30 percent reduction in tumor growth over 14 days of treatment when compared to the control. A 2012 Journal of Molecular Medicine study found tumors in mice with laboratory-induced colon cancer shrunk with CBD treatment. A 2013 study published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics found that CBD triggers cell death in certain lung cancer cell lines, decreasing tumor viability.
This is a hugely beneficial effect of CBD. Free radicals are the culprits when it comes to oxidative damage and inflammation. But CBD’s antioxidant properties can help to combat the negative effects of everyday exposure to elements that increase the production of free radicals. These elements include pervasive, but hugely unsurprising, things like:
All this talk about THC lands us nicely in the whole “Full Spectrum vs. Pure Isolate” debate. Once you begin shopping for CBD products, you’ll notice a lot of jargon that gets thrown around without much explanation. Now that we’ve introduced THC into the conversation, we can talk about the difference between, and relative benefits of, Full Spectrum CBD and CBD Isolate (and the lesser-known contender: Broad Spectrum).

For some, having more than trace amounts of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) might not be a big deal, but if you’re being drug tested at work, operating heavy machinery, or fall into a number of other categories, you may want to keep the THC to a bare minimum. In order to qualify as a legal hemp product, CBD oil must contain less than 0.03% THC. Look for CBD oil certified to have low levels of, or zero, THC in them. Many reputable sellers do offer products that have absolutely no THC in them at all, so if you are concerned about keeping even trace amounts of TCH out of your body, it is best to look for those products and sellers.
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