Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 – Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.” Defines “industrial hemp” to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law. ~ https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/525
Watch Out For: Hemp grown in the European Union (EU) and China. Even in countries with agricultural regulations, the list of approved pesticides is far from safe. Thus you are really relying on the specific company’s ethical standards when it comes to hemp cultivation. The reason this is such a big deal with hemp when compared to other plants, is that hemp is a dynamic accumulator plant. Dynamic accumulator is a term used to describe plants that gather minerals – both good and bad – from the surrounding soil and store them in its tissues. So if you’re growing a hemp plant with petroleum-based pesticides in soil that contains heavy metals…you’re inevitably going to have a hemp plant containing both toxic pesticides and heavy metals. This is why many people have poor experiences when first trying CBD – you buy your vegetables organically, why not your hemp? The presence of these toxins is not regulated by any agency and they will end up in your CBD oil if you don’t purchase from the correct company. We like Ambary Gardens because they ensure that all of their CBD products are produced from organically and sustainably grown hemp without the use of pesticides.

Ultimately, the quality of any CBD oil comes down to the extraction process that’s used, and how well the concentrate is produced and finalized. Here’s the thing, though: like we mentioned earlier, products from the Cannabis ruderalis plant (aka hemp) are assumed to be legal by some as long as they are imported into the U.S. from other countries. The only problem with this, of course, is that raw material from low THC- Plants, such as C. ruderalis is typically low in active cannabinoids, including CBD.

The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.
CBD oil is a refined oil rich in the cannabinoid molecule cannabidiol, more commonly known as CBD. Unlike it’s more infamous cousin, THC, CBD is not psychoactive, meaning it doesn’t cause the traditional high associated with cannabis. And while CBD oil can be sourced from any cannabis plant, it is commonly derived from agricultural hemp—cannabis plants bred to express less than 0.3% THC and thus have no intoxicating potential.
While THC affects your brain’s endocannabinoid receptors (resulting in the high), CBD does not attach directly to the receptors. Instead, it influences your body into using its own natural supply of cannabinoids more effectively. That is to say, it can inhibit or activate compounds in the ECS, which in turn can impact the amount of pain you feel or limit inflammation in the brain and nervous system.
What is clear though, is that with research on CBD and cannabis showing indisputably positive results, legalization has been picking up pace around the globe. And with CBD hemp oil already legal throughout much of the US, Australia and the EU, millions of people are already experiencing the benefits of CBD, with numbers only increasing exponentially.
For some, having more than trace amounts of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) might not be a big deal, but if you’re being drug tested at work, operating heavy machinery, or fall into a number of other categories, you may want to keep the THC to a bare minimum. In order to qualify as a legal hemp product, CBD oil must contain less than 0.03% THC. Look for CBD oil certified to have low levels of, or zero, THC in them. Many reputable sellers do offer products that have absolutely no THC in them at all, so if you are concerned about keeping even trace amounts of TCH out of your body, it is best to look for those products and sellers.
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