Some companies, especially those who sell their products at a ridiculously low price, may use cheap methods when extracting CBD oil. This requires toxic solvents that are dangerous to our health such as propane, hexane, pentane and butane. Two of these are commonly used in gas stoves and ranges, such as propane and butane, and all of them are hydrocarbon gases found in petroleum.

It’s not difficult to find someone who has been impacted by cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute in 2016, an estimated 1,685,210 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and 595,690 people will die from the disease. In addition, the number of people living beyond a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024. Newly approved cancer drugs cost an average of $10,000 per month, with some therapies topping $30,000 per month. This doesn’t include the cost of chemotherapy, provider fees, or lost income. These staggering statistics provide a bleak outlook for cancer patients. What if there was a better way to help patients? Could CBD provide any benefits? Let’s look deeper.
Both the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society recognize the potential of CBD oil in suppressing and fighting the spread of life-threatening cancer cells. Although they claim that CBD can’t be a cure, a growing number of studies suggest that cannabidiol can help to suppress the development and progression of various cancers, such as lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers.
Cannabinoids are naturally available in the cannabis plant but are also commercially available in synthetic drugs approved by the FDA. Dronabinol, a synthetic version of THC, is used to treat nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy and is prescribed when other drugs have failed to work. Nabilone is a synthetic version of CBD also used to treat nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.
As of now, there are only 9 states (and Washington, D.C.) that permit the use of marijuana on a recreational level. This means that, depending on where you live, it may or may not be possible to just walk into a dispensary and ask for a bottle of fine quality CBD oil. Also, some of those 9 states (even though they are recreationally legal for weed) may actually require you to obtain a medical marijuana card or a physician’s recommendation for CBD oil. If this is the case, though, it’s really no biggy as getting an online recommendation is incredibly easy nowadays, and can usually be done in minutes..
That’s why, when it comes to purchasing CBD products, you need to know what to look out for before you start browsing. Do you know which companies have a reputation for producing low-quality versus high-quality CBD products? Do you know which lab results you should ask to see? Or which manufacturing certifications point to quality practices being adhered to?

Cannabidiol Oil, or CBD as it’s more commonly known, has recently moved to the forefront in the medical cannabis diaspora. It’s a rising star, boasting wide-ranging health benefits.Cannabidiol CBD is one of at least 85 known cannabinoids. These are compounds found in the cannabis plant. Unlike its infamous cousin THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), however, CBD has no psychoactive properties whatsoever.

Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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