Upon investigation there are companies that engage in the use of “window dressing.” For example, one popular brand brags that they use the superfood moringa. This of course lures people in. But keep in mind that for added antioxidant benefit, you would need to ingest 7.5 g (7,500 mg) within the context of a meal or beverage. The entire 30 ml bottle of said brand contains 33.3 mg; so at the recommended dose of 1 ml daily, the daily dose of moringa would only be 1.11 mg.
However, at this point, research is still needed, and the surest way to avoid scams is to beware of those products that claim to cure everything. Maybe they do have beneficial properties, but playing with people’s minds and hearts and with their desperate need to find a reliable treatment for painful conditions is not the right way to promote a product.
So what is the science behind these stories? There have been limited scientific studies done on humans in the United States due to the schedule one classification of cannabis. But an emerging body of studies have shown the potential for cannabis and CBD’s antitumor effects and research from nations unblocked by government restrictions, like Israel, is making waves in the medical marijuana community.
One of the more visible cases of using CBD to treat cancer was done by Tommy Chong. Famous for his comedy albums, Cheech and Chong, Tommy is a vocal cannabis activist and user. In 2012, Chong was diagnosed with prostate cancer and used CBD oil and a natural diet to treat his condition, opting out of expensive and aggressive medical procedures. Chong was quoted saying he was,“cancer-free thanks to a disciplined diet … and the use of hemp (hash) oil.”
CBD isolate will not show up on any drug test because it’s not made from the whole plant; traces of THC are within the legal limit & individual states are now passing laws to protect employees who are medical marijuana patients. It’s changing constantly & many states have patient advocacy groups that help new patients navigate the big learning curve.
To be certain you’re getting test results you can trust, look for a CBD oil that’s been tested by someone other than the company selling it. Independent testing companies stake their reputations on every test, so they’re not biased toward manufacturers. These third-party testers are looking to identify what’s actually in the product, whether the manufacturer likes the results or not.
The manufacturer will probably give you a recommended dosage, but bear in mind that this isn’t set in stone. What you need to find is your own minimum effective dose. “Minimum effective dose” is a medical term which refers to the amount of a substance you need for the results you want, and above which, the substance doesn’t increase in effectiveness.

I currently have severe back issues due to a herniated disc. I was given Gabapentin which helped in 1 area and still hurt in another, but I didn’t like the side effects so I got off it. Now I’m back to lack of sleep due to the pain, mobility issues.My husband thought maybe I try this- my issue is my size. I’m not sure how to go about the dosage. I’m 5’0 150lbs so I’m little. Any ideas

However, at this point, research is still needed, and the surest way to avoid scams is to beware of those products that claim to cure everything. Maybe they do have beneficial properties, but playing with people’s minds and hearts and with their desperate need to find a reliable treatment for painful conditions is not the right way to promote a product.
Some industry insiders argue that organic, pharmaceutical-grade ethanol, which is a grain alcohol, is optimal and eliminates certain toxins and residues in the raw plant material itself. But others say that while this extraction method yields a high amount of cannabinoids and is GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) for human consumption, it destroys the plant’s waxes, leading to a less potent oil.
I said the stuff you see advertised ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD – I wasn’t referring to anything that’s “not from a dispensary”. Where I live (outside Galveston TX) there are a few places that advertise “CBD Sold here” and I’ve tried it, was a complete waste of money. I have used Green Roads and I know for a fact it is a good CBD oil that has great results. Just can’t really afford to buy a bottle every two weeks. I had an MMJ card when I lived back in PA but unfortunately Texas doesn’t have a medical program
CBD testing shouldn’t just tell you what’s in a CBD oil, which is usually CBD along with a carrier oil like grapeseed oil and maybe some other essential oils for flavor. It should also let you know what’s not in the package. Thorough testing can confirm that the oil you’re buying is not only real CBD, but that it’s free of contaminants like pesticides and synthetic CBD substitutes.

Cannabidiol, more commonly known as CBD, is one of 113 known cannabinoids found in cannabis. But unlike its better-known counterpart THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), responsible for cannabis’ mind-altering effects, extensive research suggests that CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is most commonly found in oil-based form, which may be applied topically, ingested or sprayed.
I was looking for a right marijuana strain that could help me with my chronic back pain. I’m suffering from it for almost 2 months now I just don’t know if it’s connected to my work since I’m sitting more or less 9 hours. I came a cross with this marijuana strain https://eu.gyo.green/barneys-farm-cbd-blue-shark-bar-cbs-f.html . This is the first time that I would be taking medical marijuana I’m not sure if this would be effective with my back pain. Also is there any other way using it medically?
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