For some, having more than trace amounts of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) might not be a big deal, but if you’re being drug tested at work, operating heavy machinery, or fall into a number of other categories, you may want to keep the THC to a bare minimum. In order to qualify as a legal hemp product, CBD oil must contain less than 0.03% THC. Look for CBD oil certified to have low levels of, or zero, THC in them. Many reputable sellers do offer products that have absolutely no THC in them at all, so if you are concerned about keeping even trace amounts of TCH out of your body, it is best to look for those products and sellers.
To be certain you’re getting test results you can trust, look for a CBD oil that’s been tested by someone other than the company selling it. Independent testing companies stake their reputations on every test, so they’re not biased toward manufacturers. These third-party testers are looking to identify what’s actually in the product, whether the manufacturer likes the results or not.

CBD & THC are just 2 of many cannabiniods that will be seen on certificates of analysis; CBN for example is known to treat insomnia due to it’s sedating qualities & the list of terpenes, is long & each one has it’s own specific medicinal value. There’s a tremendous amount of learning involved with finding the right CBD product as well as the individual doseage; it’s advised for all beginners to “start slow & low”.

All of the product reviews listed on this website are real reviews from real users. Recommended brands are selected solely based on merit. Our vetting process includes analysis of product quality based on third party lab reports, customer service quality and responsiveness, industry reputation, company longevity and customer feedback. Per FTC guidelines, we do participate in the affiliate programs of some but not all of the recommended brands whereby we receive a small commission on purchases made through links on this website. Any references to third party products, prices or websites referenced in this group are subject to change without notice.

In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
The human body has an endocannabinoid system — a natural system that maintains homeostasis or balance, in the body. The endocannabinoid system has CB1 and CB2 receptors. These are found throughout the body. CB1 receptors are generally located in the central and peripheral nervous system and CB2 receptors are generally found in the brain, immune system, and gastrointestinal system. CBD binds to these receptors creating changes and effects in the body
While CBD is capable of aiding in so many conditions, there are limits to its abilities. It is therefore vital that you know what CBD is and what it can do before you go shopping for some yourself. Many of the less trustworthy vendors of CBD oil will claim that it can do just about anything! If you’ve done your research, though, you will know that this is not exactly true, and you can save yourself a whole lot of time and money.
This may seem like a repeat of an earlier question, but while that question related to concentration of CBD in the product, this is simply a question of how much you’re getting in total. Most bottles are labeled in a similar way – “1,000mg CBD Oil” or “1,000mg Hemp Extract” – which generally means the entire bottle contains a total of 1,000mg of CBD.
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