GMP stands for Good Manufacturing Practices, and it covers the practices required to ensure products are produced according to industry standards. The agencies that control the authorization and licensing of the manufacture and sale of these products provide guidelines, and the manufacturer must adhere to these guidelines to make sure their products remain consistent and of high quality from batch to batch.
CBD capsules are all about convenience. They’re portable, discreet, easy to take, of a higher concentration, and have no taste whatsoever. Because of this, you’ll usually end up paying a little more per serving than some other CBD product types. If price is a concern, consider trying CBD concentrates. They’re the most pure form of CBD oil and are also the most cost-effective.
However, since the 1950s it has been lumped into the same category of marijuana, and thus the extremely versatile crop was doomed in the United States. Industrial hemp is technically from the same species of plant that psychoactive marijuana comes from. However, it is from a different variety, or subspecies that contains many important differences. The main differences between industrial hemp and marijuana will be discussed below.
CBD capsules don’t come much better than these cannabidiol supplement capsules from Plus CBD Oil. They’re incredibly easy to use and allow you to keep track of your daily serving size, all while offering a much higher concentration of CBD than tinctures or vape oils. The capsules are non-GMO, vegan, and kosher—perfect for specific dietary requirements. Simply take one to two capsules per day to enjoy between 15 and 30 milligrams of high-quality CBD.
And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes – if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called  “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
That’s why, when it comes to purchasing CBD products, you need to know what to look out for before you start browsing. Do you know which companies have a reputation for producing low-quality versus high-quality CBD products? Do you know which lab results you should ask to see? Or which manufacturing certifications point to quality practices being adhered to?
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So, now we’ve covered the difference between marijuana and hemp products, along with the brief discussion on CBD vs THC.  We’ve covered how to decide how much to buy.  And, we’ve covered how to determine which product type is best for you.  (If you’d like to read more very helpful information, please view our Frequently Asked Questions by clicking the button further down the page.)  Below are a few key points about Highland Pharms to wrap up our discussion:
Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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