In short, Cannabidiol – or CBD – is a cannabis compound that has many therapeutic benefits. Usually extracted from the leaves and flowers of hemp plants – though marijuana can also be a source – CBD oil is then incorporated into an array of marketable products. These products vary from the most common, like sublingual oils and topical lotions, to the less common (think CBD lattes). Basically, if you can dream it, you can buy it.

GMP stands for Good Manufacturing Practices, and it covers the practices required to ensure products are produced according to industry standards. The agencies that control the authorization and licensing of the manufacture and sale of these products provide guidelines, and the manufacturer must adhere to these guidelines to make sure their products remain consistent and of high quality from batch to batch.


And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes – if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called  “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.

Watch Out For: Hemp grown in the European Union (EU) and China. Even in countries with agricultural regulations, the list of approved pesticides is far from safe. Thus you are really relying on the specific company’s ethical standards when it comes to hemp cultivation. The reason this is such a big deal with hemp when compared to other plants, is that hemp is a dynamic accumulator plant. Dynamic accumulator is a term used to describe plants that gather minerals – both good and bad – from the surrounding soil and store them in its tissues. So if you’re growing a hemp plant with petroleum-based pesticides in soil that contains heavy metals…you’re inevitably going to have a hemp plant containing both toxic pesticides and heavy metals. This is why many people have poor experiences when first trying CBD – you buy your vegetables organically, why not your hemp? The presence of these toxins is not regulated by any agency and they will end up in your CBD oil if you don’t purchase from the correct company. We like Ambary Gardens because they ensure that all of their CBD products are produced from organically and sustainably grown hemp without the use of pesticides.

GMP stands for Good Manufacturing Practices, and it covers the practices required to ensure products are produced according to industry standards. The agencies that control the authorization and licensing of the manufacture and sale of these products provide guidelines, and the manufacturer must adhere to these guidelines to make sure their products remain consistent and of high quality from batch to batch.


Ultimately, the quality of any CBD oil comes down to the extraction process that’s used, and how well the concentrate is produced and finalized. Here’s the thing, though: like we mentioned earlier, products from the Cannabis ruderalis plant (aka hemp) are assumed to be legal by some as long as they are imported into the U.S. from other countries. The only problem with this, of course, is that raw material from low THC- Plants, such as C. ruderalis is typically low in active cannabinoids, including CBD.
Every CBD product should make third-party lab results available, either online, in their packaging, or by request. At minimum, each tincture here offers lab results showing the levels of cannabinoids like CBD and THC, while others offer additional tests. The more information available to consumers the better. At the same time, we admit it isn’t always easy for newcomers to interpret these lab tests.
But there’s a big difference between the two. Hemp seed oil has been pressed from hemp seed, and it’s great for a lot of things – it’s good for you, tastes great, and can be used in soap, paint – even as biodiesel fuel. However, hemp seed oil does not contain any concentration of cannabinoids at all, including CBD. So by all means, stock up at your local natural food store. Just don’t expect to reap the benefits of a true CBD oil when you cook with hemp seed oil.
At a molecular level, CBD (short for cannabidiol) is CBD, regardless of which plant it comes from.  The only difference comes from the full extract that is taken from the plants.  Here’s what we mean:  Once the plants are harvested, the lab removes the nutrients, including CBD, from the plants in the form of a gooey extract.  This extract includes the CBD, but also so much more and this gooey extract is what goes into all the CBD products*.  There are actually many cannabinoids other than just cannabidiol (CBD).  Some are CBC, CBG, CBN and even THC.  THC is the compound found in marijuana that causes the “high” or psychotropic or euphoric effect.  As most of us know, marijuana naturally has a fairly high level of this compound.  Hemp naturally has a very low level, so low that no one reports any sort of high when using the extract from hemp.

CBD oil is similar to other products in that it is capable of being “watered down.” Some companies will try to eke out a higher profit margin by fooling their customers into thinking they’re getting more for less. It is important to pay attention to the concentration level of the CBD oil you’re buying in order to ensure you’re getting what you’re paying for. Although concentrations of CBD can vary quite a bit across the broad range of CBD products, a quality product will start off having somewhere between 250mg to 1,000mg per fluid ounce. This matters because if you were to purchase a 4 ounce bottle that contained 250mg of CBD, your concentration would be a mere 62.5 mg of CBD per ounce – hardly enough to reap the full benefits of CBD. It’s always important to look at the concentration level of the CBD you’re buying.
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