Look for brands who source their cannabinoids from organic-certified, hemp-grown farms in pristine regions of Europe. “The German regulatory system is strict and enforced, providing confidence in the superiority of their harvest, processes, and extraction quality,” adds Moriarity. Organic hemp grown in Europe must also adhere to EU’s strict organic standards, which are stricter than in the U.S. and highly audited. Also, look for ingredients that are certified organic and wildcrafted.

Called a week later, and was told to email the manager, and was informed he always responds within 1-2 days. Emailed him, and it’s been 2 weeks, since. I called GreenRoads, asked my question, and got an immediate, literate response (multiple hemp sources), as well as a discussion on what differences might or might not occur, and how to check lab sheets for comparison. Switched over to GreenRoads, which seems otherwise comparable in its manufacturing methodology to Elixinol.
To add to the challenges, brands in the CBD space are struggling to verify their own products. Laura White, founder of Soul Addict, started a CBD line after she found it helped her with crippling anxiety. Wanting to create a reliable product in both purity and potency, she’d test on top of the farm’s tests and kept running into the same problem: The lab results didn’t match. When White finally found a farm that had accurate tests, she’d partner with them. A few years later, Soul Addict now sources all its CBD through small, family-run farms in Colorado and White is in the process of integrating her own crops from North Carolina. The lesson she learned? Brands should be constantly testing their product to verify their farms’ reports.
We’ve systematically sought out the most beautiful and healthy hemp cultivars for our raw ingredients used in CBD oil manufacturing, and we always test for purity and potency. Hemp, because of its innate ability to thrive easily, doesn’t require pesticides (the aromatic terpene compounds in hemp can actually act as natural pesticides), fertilizers, or herbicides in its cultivation, and requires much less water than standard commercial farming. The hemp we use is grown under the same methods and standards of organic farming.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 – Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.” Defines “industrial hemp” to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law. ~ https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/525
Finally, most of the products below simply contain hemp oil extract, mixed with a neutral carrier oil like hemp seed oil or coconut oil. While hemp seed oil is packed with nutrition, CBD brands are beginning to offer supplements with added ingredients that may offer additional benefits. We’ve included the complete ingredients of every product. Be sure to avoid any known allergies and investigate the pros and cons of any additional ingredients.

Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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