All the products we carry use the same hemp extract discussed above.  So, it doesn’t really matter which product type you get, you’re still getting the same extract.  And, that’s all that really matters.  So, the decision as to which product type to get comes down mainly to preference.  Do you prefer the specific measuring ability of the drops?  Do you prefer the convenience of a capsule?  These are merely preferences for the most part.
Mimi says the effective oils are made from the marijuana plant, not hemp. Why are you rating only hemp oils? Are hemp oils the only oils that do not have any THC? The other question that arises is the difference between ml and mg in measuring the strength of these oils. They are quoted as ml, but there is the question of the “density” limit of 95mg? Very confusing.

If you are vaporizing CBD-dominant strains of cannabis, bioavailability is through the alveoli, tiny sacs in the lungs, clarifies Kilham. If you are taking CBD strain capsules, he suggests eating some fat or oil, like a handful of nuts or some full-fat yogurt, to improve absorption and bioavailability. Cannabinoids are fat-loving molecules. They are taken up readily into the small intestine with a bit of dietary fat.
Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 – Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.” Defines “industrial hemp” to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law. ~ https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/525
There are SO many CBD brands out there! We carry only those that we have tried ourselves, and had tested at a 3rd party lab. We want to make sure that all the good things (like an accurate amount of cannabinoids) are in there! And that all the not so good things (like psychotropic compounds, heavy metals, and pesticides) are not there. We also choose to work with those companies that service their customers just as we do. Here are some of our favorite (and best selling!) brands:
Correct Answer: Each batch of flower AND finished product should be tested by a state certified testing facility for potency, legality and safety. These test results should also be made available to any patient that requests them. These tests should certify 3 things: the amount of CBD contained in the product, the amount of THC in the product (the starting hemp plant material must test below 0.3%), and the lack of mold or toxic pesticides.
Unregulated markets come with some obvious risks; lack of oversight, false claims, the potential for dangerous pesticides and contaminants. Cannabis, in states where it’s legal, is regulated. Sold in state-licensed stores (akin to states controlling liquor stores, except with higher taxes and much stricter regulations) aka dispensaries, you can be confident that the CBD-dominant cannabis tinctures, topicals, vapes, and edibles on shelves are accountable to purity and accuracy tests.
Tinctures are ideal for CBD novices, as they’re not always as strong as other CBD product types. If you know how much CBD you require and you’re after a higher concentration, a regular CBD tincture is unlikely to deliver the goods. However, this is beginning to change as companies experiment with higher concentrations. In the meantime, consider a vape oil, paste, or concentrate to enjoy a stronger CBD experience.
Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 – Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.” Defines “industrial hemp” to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law. ~ https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/525

It is a strict violation of the Food and Drug Administration DSHEA guidelines to make medical claims about the efficacy of CBD products in the treatment of any medical condition or symptom. Although preliminary research has shown tremendous promise of CBD oil helping people in pretty remarkable ways, legitimate CBD companies will refrain from making any direct medical claims. Be very wary of companies that defy this guideline, because if they disregard this particular rule, what other rules are they willing to ignore?
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