CBD is extracted from Industrial Hemp Plants that contain Cannabinoids. You cannot experience any psychoactive effects “High or Stoned” with our products. They all contain less that .3% THC or 0% THC. Every major civilization in history has recognized hemp as #1 on its list of important plants. The ancient Chinese, Indians, Egyptians, Assyrians, Persians, Greeks and Romans all revered hemp as an incomparable source of food and medicine. Now modern science is validating what the ancients all knew — and uncovering exciting new discoveries about CBD. Recently (August 2017) FDA has declared CBD as “beneficial” and is asking now all users of CBD products for their input.

The main difference between CBD and Hemp is that Hemp does not contain CBD. CBD and hemp oils are made from different parts of the plant and have different purposes. CBD is a compound found in industrial hemp, and we utilize a whole plant CO2 extraction that allows us to draw the CBD from the plant material and filter out unnatural substances, maximizing pure CBD concentration. While CBD is extracted from the entire plant, minus the seeds, hemp is extracted only from the seeds. Hemp oil is made from pressing hemp seeds and is used in a variety of products. Hemp-seed oil is used as a protein supplement for food, as varnish for wood and, because of its remedial properties for hair and skin, as an ingredient in lotion and soap products. You can buy hemp-seed oil online or at certain food stores, where you can learn about more ways to incorporate it into your diet and hygiene. CBD oil is generally used for medicinal purposes and has shown great promise in treating inflammation, pain, sleeping disorders and even certain types of epileptic seizures.

That’s why, when it comes to purchasing CBD products, you need to know what to look out for before you start browsing. Do you know which companies have a reputation for producing low-quality versus high-quality CBD products? Do you know which lab results you should ask to see? Or which manufacturing certifications point to quality practices being adhered to?
The first step to finding your correct CBD dosage is getting as much information as you can about the product you’re using. What is the concentration of CBD? Are there third-party lab tests that can confirm that? The CBD industry is still mainly a grassroots therapeutic movement, and as such, largely unregulated. Concentration and purity levels can differ greatly depending on the manufacturing process.  
There is a tremendous difference between CBD from hemp vs the actual cannabis plant; not addressed the fact that you are discussing CBD from hemp in the beginning of the article is confusing to those who have not been able to do their own research yet. I’ve been trying different CBD products for 2 years now & at first read, I thought you were talking about cannabis.
That’s why, when it comes to purchasing CBD products, you need to know what to look out for before you start browsing. Do you know which companies have a reputation for producing low-quality versus high-quality CBD products? Do you know which lab results you should ask to see? Or which manufacturing certifications point to quality practices being adhered to?
Transparent test results that are easily accessible also help customers ensure they’re looking at data that’s relevant to the product they’re actually ordering. Past performance is no guarantee of future results, and a good grade for one batch of product doesn’t always translate to the next round. That’s why responsible testers don’t stop at one good result, but continually update customers with the latest data available on their products.
Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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