One of the main appeals of CBD oil (apart from its obvious health benefits) is that it will not get you high. The famous “buzz” associated with cannabis is solely down to THC, and this is so often where less knowledgeable people get confused. CBD oil on its own should not provide any high to the user, and this is why it is such a popular choice for the treatment of so many conditions.
Transparent test results that are easily accessible also help customers ensure they’re looking at data that’s relevant to the product they’re actually ordering. Past performance is no guarantee of future results, and a good grade for one batch of product doesn’t always translate to the next round. That’s why responsible testers don’t stop at one good result, but continually update customers with the latest data available on their products.
“The need for enhanced bioavailability of the CBD phytonutrient is paramount”, adds Moriarity, “but tricky to accomplish without synthetic chemicals.” Most CBD products do not offer any bioavailability optimization, so 90 percent of the CBD is lost to first-pass effect, a phenomenon of drug metabolism whereby the concentration of a drug is greatly reduced before it reaches systemic circulation.
Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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